Know Your Ingredients: Diazolidinyl Urea

Diazolidinyl_urea

What it is
Diazolidinyl Urea is a white powder.

What it does
Diazolidinyl Urea is a preservative that prevents bacterial growth. It works by releasing small amounts of formaldehyde.

Side effects
Although Diazolidinyl releases toxic formaldehyde, the amounts are too small to pose a threat to human health. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel considers Diazolidinyl Urea safe to be used in cosmetics up to a maximum concentration of 0.5%. In Europe, when the concentration of formaldehyde in the finished product exceeds 0.05%, the labels has to state “contains formaldehyde”.
However, Diazolidinyl Urea can cause irritations and allergies.

(Source: paulaschoice.com)
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Comments

  1. beautifulwithbrains says

    Hi Jasmine, I didn’t mean to cause a scare. Formaldehyde is really nasty stuff and although the FDA says it isn’t dangerous in very small quantities I stay away from it. I don’t think it’s gonna kill since the concentrations are low, but still who would want toxic stuff in their bodies in the first place? I’d rather have no formaldehyde at all instead of small amounts in the first place, esp when there are other preservatives who work just as well but don’t release any toxic stuff.

  2. beautifulwithbrains says

    Hi Barbara, diazolidinyl urea can be derived both from animal or synthetic sources. However in cosmetics products diazolidinyl urea is made by the reaction of allantoin (a substance derived from the extracts of the comfrey plant) and formaldehyde.

  3. Barbara Gunter says

    Thanks for fast reply. I work in retail and a gentleman customer refused to buy a hand softener because of this ingredient thinking it a derivative of urine. He piqued my interest. the websites I checked were not clear on the source either.

  4. beautifulwithbrains says

    You’re welcome Barbara. There is a lot of confusion on this topic because some ingredients, like Urea, are components of urine. But in cosmetics, synthetic versions are used. You can tell your clients not too worry, they won’t be putting urine on their faces.

    • kanwal says

      dear barbara you are right but one lipstick has many ingredients.and for me it matters a lot that either ther are from plant source or not.believe i `m so confused these das that wahat i`m using??????

      • beautifulwithbrains says

        Kanwal, there is so much contradicting and misleading information about cosmetic ingredients on the internet that it’s impossible not to get confused! But contrary to popular belief, chemicals aren’t toxic and plant derived ingredients always good. There good chemical ingredients and bad chemical ingredients, like there are good natural ingredients and bad natural ingredients.

        An useful website to check out is http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/. It’s one of my favourite sources as it is a collection of scientific studies and their conclusions. All of the information on there is based on science not on pseudo science aiming to scare people. Some studies can be a bit hard to understand if one is not a scientific person though so if you need help, let me know.

        And having said that, if one prefers to use natural and organic ingredients, there is absolutely nothing wrong with it. :)

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Barbara, as far as I know it’s not. And if you all have any questions, I’m always glad to help if I can. :)

  5. Jim says

    Hi, I arrived at your site researching Diazolidinyl Urea. It’s one of 3 major ingredients in the cosmetics that my girlfriend uses and she was just told is allergic too. Vicki is desperately searching for alternative cosmetics. The other 2 are Methyldibromo glutaronitrite/Phenoxyethanol and Propolis (beeswax). These eliminate many of her sunscreens, lip protections, and anti-aging products. Can you advise, perhaps send links to where and/or how we can track down alternatives? Great site, btw, and your dedication is tremendous. I’m the boyfriend trying to help out.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Jim, thanks. And how kind of you to want to help out your girlfriend, she’s lucky to have you! I’m sorry to hear she’s allergic to a few cosmetic ingredients, that’s awful! Unfortunately I don’t what else to suggest apart from reading the ingredient lists of products when she buys them so as to avoid. Avoiding Diazolidinyl Urea is quite easy as there are lots of products out there that don’t containing. The only tricky one is Beeswax as it is in so many products! You may want to check out my post on Beeswax, where lots of people came forward saying they are allergic to it and recommended Beeswax-free products that work well for them. Here’s the link: http://beautifulwithbrains.com/2008/10/25/know-your-ingredients-beeswax/

      Hope this helps.

  6. shanna says

    I found this by researching the ingredients in my Bath and Body works Plumeria Lotion…. welp… all of their products contain this… and its not Vegan…fyi. :(

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Shanna, I’m not surprised they use it as it is very inexpensive. But as long as they didn’t claim their products to be vegan I don’t see the problem with it. I don’t mind using synthetic ingredients, although I know some people don’t like them.

  7. Gwen Stewart says

    I just purchased Serious Skin Care Olive oil products for face and body on HSN today. I was actually careless doing this, as I always read the ingredients and prefer to use products Not tested on Animals. This said..I checked the ingredients just now and Diazolidinyl Urea is listed on a couple of them, and was concerned what it actually was! I dont have allergies to skin care products, should this concern me?

    Thank you.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Gwen, Diazolidinyl Urea is a preservative and is used to make product last longer. It has gained a bad reputation because it works by releasing formaldehyde, which is toxic. However, the amount of formaldehyde released is so minuscule that it doesn’t pose any risk to human health. In any case, using products without preservatives would be more dangerous as they could harbour bacteria and give people infections. Should you be concerned? Honestly, I don’t think so as it is perfectly safe. The only reason I see to avoid it is if you prefer to use natural ingredients but apart from that, it’s not bad for you.

  8. naima says

    hi;i have read te advice you give in regards of diazolidinyl urea you have said that its for preservative for the product to last long and to avoid bacteria; is it from animal urine or its extracted from plant?thanks for educating us about cosmetic product.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Naima, you are welcome and I hope you find these posts useful. As for diazolidinyl urea, the type used in cosmetics is usually synthetically made in a lab.

  9. says

    thank you so much,fast i like the name beutifulwithbrains…nice…thanks fro your eply and the links i have understnd that these is actually ascientific name , its are product made in the lab its have the scientific name other wise this is nt urine or the sort. hopee how i understood is correct thax.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Naima, diazolidinyl urea is the scientific name and the type used in cosmetics is synthetic and doesn’t derive from urine.

  10. Prity says

    Hi, my name is Prity from kenya,africa. Im 17yrs old, i have a dark brown complexion. I have been having problems with my face 4 quite sometime now. I have acne on my forehead,i have open pores and discolouration on my cheeks and nose. I was wondering what products should i use because i have tried all sorts of products recommended by a beautician but they dont seem to work. I’ve tried sebamed care gel,black opal anti acne lotion,nivea,vaseline,forever living products but they havnt cured my problems. I have sensitive,combination skin. Please help? My self-esteem is really low because of this:(

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Prity, I’m sorry to hear about your problem and how it is affecting your self-esteem. You should use a gentle cleanser and exfoliate your skin twice a week with a salicylic acid product. To treat the acne on your forehead, I’d use either a product with Benzyl Peroxide or Tea Tree Oil (but make sure its concentration is at least 5% or it will be useless). I also think you should consult a dermatologist as he/she will be able to prescribe the best skincare routine for you.

    • Angela says

      Hi prity, I know you live far but if you want I can help you with your acne problem. 
      My email address is angelicious8383@yahoo.com
      A friend of mine has a skin problem besides bad acne & it’s called keloids I believe they call it, basically her body produces an over amount of collagen cells & she suffers from what look like large acne type blisters that happen above the skin. She would get these really bad on her shoulders & her face, chest, & back would also get bad breakouts-real red & pimples were painful & scarring from her acne. She seen a dermatologist who told her that her only option was he could give her keloids a hormone shot to help them go down (very painful). But he said there’s no topical solution out there that will get rid of them. Her face acne he advised proactive or a strong retinol product, well none worked. I then asked her if she’d like me to make her something that will help clear up her skin. She was very doubtful & resisted, telling me that nothing will work. Well she can be very stubborn but I made it anyway & showed her how simple it is to use & since it’s only1step to do use it, instead of 3 she took it home. Well she decided to try it, about 3-4 maybe 5 days later she came by to bring me brownies. Ha I thought whats the occasion & when I seen her she was all dressed up & wearing a spaghetti strap tank top, which I’d never seen her wear outside before. As soon as she got up my stairs she said I tried it, it really is helping my shoulders! They aren’t red, sore, & her large keloids had begun diminishing in size. Even the acne on her shoulders & face had cleared a lot. Nothing was swelling on her skin, I told her for anything that was happening below the skin there is something else she can try & this is just an old remedy my moms been doing & taught me to, since I can remember. You take an 1 egg white & put it in a bowl. Whip it up just a bit & apply it to your whole face… Or wherever has acne. Be sure not to get it too close to your mouth or eyes, as well as wash your hands if you apply it with them. Then you just relax & let it dry. Try not to move your face to much while it dries you will feel it stiffening as it tightens the pores. Once it’s completely dry you can go rinse of with warm water. If you can, grab some Johnson & Johnson baby shampoo, its gentle & washes your face & removes makeup.  Also one last trick you can try is restoring the skins PH balance, so if you can get some White Vinegar from your kitchen or market & put some on a cotton ball & just slightly rub over your whole face in a circular motion. This will shock your skin practically, beneficial if you do this before any treatments to your face or even hair.  If your interested in the product I made for my friend I can make you some & try sending it to ya. I don’t expect money from you or anything, I just hope it works as well as it did for my friend. It’s safe & beneficial to any skin type because I gave some to my mom who loves it, & I used it. I know all about self esteem issues & I know how much better one can feel, when they aren’t self-conscious. You should feel beautiful, every girl should! Like Kevin Aucoin said, “put your best face forward”. ;0)

  11. Prity says

    Are there any home remedies that would work for the time being as i save money that i will use to buy the products? And also are baby wipes that are alcohol free,fragrance free,no propylene glycol good for my skin?

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Prity, yes, those wipes would be suitable for your skin. I don’t really know of any home remedies that would work as well as the products I recommended for acne and discolorations and you just risk making things worse. For now, I’d just treat skin gently and use gentle products that won’t irritate it more.

  12. Angela says

    What happens if they contain diazolidinyl urea but doesn’t say contains formaldehyde any where on product?

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Angela, I don’t think products with diazolidinyl urea need to state on the labels that they contain formaldehyde. It is true that this preservative works by releasing formaldehyde, but the levels of formaldehyde released are so minuscule that they don’t pose a threat to human health.

      • angela says

        I asked because a hair gel I bought for my kids, so they could spike their hair contains this ingredient and it wasn’t anywhere on the bottle, I was wondering whether this always produced formaldehyde or possibly not. I’m glad to know it does and I was just angry at the fact that they didn’t warn people. I have been researching formaldehyde over the last few days, finding out they use it in a lot of things. According to the National Cancer Institute Formaldehyde has been classified as a known human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and as a probable human carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

        • beautifulwithbrains says

          Angela, it is true that formaldehyde is toxic and carcinogenic, but it is the dose that makes the poison. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review, which is the agency used by the FDA to assess the safety of ingredients, has concluded that, based on all the data available today, Diazolidinyl Urea is safe as a cosmetic ingredient up to a maximum concentration of 0.5 percent. The National Cancer Institute is not a governmental agency but a political agency and these kind of organizations don’t always get science right (and often completely disregard science when it doesn’t agree with their political agenda) and so end up scaring consumers unneccessarily.

          Besides, did you know that formaldehyde naturally occurs in many foods such as apples and onions and is also produced produced as a metabolic byproduct in humans? But again, the concentrations are so small that our bodies are able to get rid of them, just like they get rid of the formaldehyde released by diazodinyl urea, so that they don’t cause cancer or any other disease in human.

          I know that when you hear formaldehyde is carcinogenic it can be scary, especially if you plan to use it on your kids, and if you want to avoid it completely that’s fine. But this ingredient has been used for decades in cosmetics without anyone ever getting ill because of it. Instead, we’re more likely to get cancer by breathing the polluted air in our towns or by eating food grown in polluted soil.

  13. naadiah says

    Hi, I notice asian like to whiten their skin.. and recently there is this one product that promise them just that, what frighten me is that it gives instant result of bleaching and I notice the product contains Diazolidinyl Urea.. Everyone is going crazy on this product, I don’t know how many percentage of it is in it.. and I’m afraid it will do more harm than good even though it is said to contain a very high level of L-glutathione =/

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Naadiah, if you tell me which product it is, and give me the ingredient list, I can try to examine it for you and tell you if it is safe. :)

  14. naadiah says

    Hi sorry for the late reply.. this is the name of the cream ‘Cathy doll L-glutathione magic cream.. the ingredients in it are : Aqua, Paraffinum Liquidum, L-Glutathione, Glycerin, Polyglyceryl-2 Dipolyhydroxystearate, Polyglyceryl-3 Disostearate, Titanium Dioxide, Hydrogenated Polyisohutene, Dimenthiconol, Cyclomethicone, Methyparaben, Diazolidinyl Urea, Propylparaben, Fragrance, CI:77891, CI:77491, CI:77492

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Naadiah, I don’t see anything in there that could be bad for you. I guess people are making such a fuss because it contains Paraffinum Liquidum and Diazolidinyl Urea. Unfortunately, these ingredients have acquired an undeserved bad reputation. People dislike paraffium liquidum because it is derived from oil and assume the two substances are the same thing, but they’re not. Paraffinum Liquidum has been highly purified, doesn’t contain any nasty impurities and studies have shown it to be both safe and very effective at moisturizing skin. Diazolidinyl Urea instead is a preservative that works by releasing formaldehyde. While formaldehyde is carcinogenic, it is released in such minuscule quantities that it won’t cause any harm at all to our health. It is always the dose that makes the poison, but sadly a lot of people don’t seem to understand that. Hope this helps.

  15. Arrha says

    Thanks so much for this post! I recently just bought an asian brand of toner that contained diazolidinyl urea and I have been searching the web for information about it before I actually try to use it since I have sensitive skin. And I’m quite spooked with what I have read so far until reading this post since most of the blogs I’ve read would include it in their Top 10/15 products to avoid. I agree that a product with preservative would be a safer choice than one which doesn’t but still formaldehyde really does sound scary. Anyway, I think the right thing to do would just be to do a patch test, which I was even afraid to do before but this entry at least eased my fears enough to do it.

    I have a question though along the same lines as that of Naadiah– I would like to ask if you think any of this ingredients would pose problems for sensitive skin (water, algae extract, aloe extract, hyaluronic acid, and diazolidinyl urea)? :)

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Arrha, formaldehyde does sound scary indeed, which is why many people add it to their list of ingredients to avoid. But what they don’t take into consideration is that it’s the dose that makes the poison. Formaldehyde is toxic in high concentrations, but the amount of it released by diazolidinyl urea is so minuscule (this preservative can, for this reason, only be used in 0.5% concentrations or less) that it won’t pose a threat to human health. It just gets expelled from our body through urine before it has time to accumulate.

      But although not toxic, the amount of formaldehyde released can still irritate very sensitive skin. It doesn’t mean it will happen, but if your skin is prone to irritations, it may be wiser to avoid it. The other ingredients you mentioned should be fine for sensitive skin. Hope this helps.

  16. yaya says

    Hi there, i’ve recently using these product from fruit of the earth. The ingredients are aqua (water), aloe vera gel,glycerin, oleth-20, tocopheryl acetate, triethanolamine, carbomer, DMDM Hydantoin, tocopheryl acetate (vit E). Is that all safe to use? I dont know how much percentage. But it seems ok. u said that diazolinidyl urea will cause an allergy, if it does not show any problem it is also safe right eventho it still will release formaldehyde in a small amount. But u said that u prefer no formaldehyde at all. Why? Is there any long term side effect for our skin or health?

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Yaya, that product is safe to use, there’s nothing in there that will harm you.

      Yes, diazolinidyl urea can cause allergies and irritations, but if you used it without experiencing any side effects there is no reason for you to stop.

      The reason why I’m not too keen on formaldehyde-releasing preservatives is that they can irritate skin (although this depends on the concentration used and how sensitive your skin is). As there are safer alternatives, such as parabens, I prefer to use those.

  17. Angela says

    If this chemical is found in food it is because Americans put it there.
    The level of concern that even the FDA acknowledges is at “Moderate” level.
    That is the step before High, in fact it has long passed the half way point, go have a keratin treatment done with it in there. People here’s the truth, and who Evers site this is, if you know anything about the study of skin, it begins within. You want gorgeous skin, stop all the doing and making unhealthy choices. Cleanse your body once in a while, detox, because here’s the kicker of info. Everything you apply to your topically, weather it be lotions, soaps, moisturizers, hair dyes, gels, perfumes, makeup, foundation, will all be absorbed into your bodies. Consider that next time you go yo buy any beauty products. Honestly if its not safe enough to eat, you shouldn’t have it anywhere.

    About DIAZOLIDINYL UREA (FORMALDEHYDE RELEASER): Diazolidinyl urea is an antimicrobial preservative that works by forming formaldehyde in cosmetic products. People exposed to such formaldehyde-releasing ingredients may develop a formaldehyde allergy or an allergy to the ingredient itself. In the U.S. approximately 20% of cosmetics and personal care products contain a formaldehyde-releaser and the frequency of contact allergy to these ingredients is much higher among Americans compared to studies in Europe.

    This ingredient may be derived from animals. From PETA’s Caring Consumer: Excreted from urine and other bodily fluids. In deodorants, ammoniated dentifrices, mouthwashes, hair colorings, hand creams, lotions, shampoos, etc. Used to “brown” baked goods, such as pretzels. Derivatives: Imidazolidinyl Urea, Uric Acid. Alternatives: synthetics.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Angela, it is true that some keratin treatments contain high levels of formaldehyde and should be avoided. But that doesn’t mean that all products that contain diazolidinyl urea are dangerous. It is the dose that makes the poison. This substance is used as a preservative and you need very little of it. The law states that it can be used in concentrations up to 0.5%, and if it is higher, here in Europe they have to state so on the packaging to warn consumers. If they don’t, they should be punished.

      It is not true that everything we put on our skin gets inside the body. The job of the skin is to protect the body and keep things OUT of it, something it does very well. Very few substances can penetrate the skin and reach the blood stream. If everything could easily penetrate it like you say, then why when we are ill we have to take a pill or get a shot to get better? If a cream worked just as well then surely more medicines would come in that form.

      It is true that diazolidinyl urea can cause irritations and allergies. If you experience a negative reaction, you should using it straight away. Otherwise, why should you discontinue its use? Anyone can become allergic to anything at any time. We can’t ban everything, but we can let people know what a product contains so they can avoid what’s bad for them.

  18. Angela says

    Your right in small doses it is considered safe, and just as the FDA approves the use of Dazolidinyl urea, and your right small doses are possibly safe, but how small of a dose are you getting if the ingredient is in your lever 2000 soap, your hair gel, your laundry detergent or fabric softener, or both, as well as the lotion you use every morning and night. Your mascara, your foundation, your concealers, and even in some of the food your ingesting? What started off as a small dose, is so easily misconstrued, no? Lets meet another ingredient approved by the FDA imidazolidinyl urea, have you heard of this one, of fly similar to the preservative we have been debating, except this ingredient is the form found in cigarettes. Just as it starts off in small doses, you use cigarettes, or these lame products consistenly over time, and there’s a good chance they will offer fates as similar as their names are, that’s all I’m saying. So your willing to suggest to a friend they should try smoking in times of stress, Im sure there are better products out there you may want to learn about before resorting to those such as these. The Federal Drug Administration has approved many different products, many which are dealing with lawsuits, greater than a heart surgeon can afford to pay, simply because it turned out to disfigure there unborn child. People it is our responsibility to do our homework, now I have been studying the chemical make up of products since I was around 7 or 8. I was intrigued by the huge words under the ingredients section of my shampoos, and toothpaste. The Internet has only made it easier to expand my knowledge. I have also studied Cosmetology and Esthetics, to be honest the natural herbs, vitamins and minerals part of the course was my favorite. I would honestly ask myself who I’m doing a favor by telling people something was safe, if I hadn’t in fact done my homework.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Angela, using several products with diazolidinyl urea would increase its concentration in our bodies only if this ingredient was capable of penetrating skin and reaching the blood stream. Do you have any scientific study that proves this? As I’ve said before, it is the skin’s job to keep stuff OUT of the body. Very few cosmetic ingredients can penetrate the skin. They simply remain on the surface and are easily removed whenever we wash it. Therefore, accumulation isn’t an issue.

      As for cigarettes, well, they have been proven to cause cancer and you should stay away from those. They contain much worse stuff than imidazolidinyl urea, and I would never recommend anyone to start smoking.

      But inhaling or ingesting something is different from topically applying it on the skin. When we inhale, ingest, or are injected with something, that something gets inside our body. If that something is dangerous for human health, then it could possibly kill you. But very little of what we put on our skin gets absorbed. And most cosmetic ingredients are used in such small amounts that, even if they were absorbed (which they, for the most part, aren’t), our kidneys would quickly get rid of them before they had a chance to accumulate and cause harm.

      I agree that it is important to do our homework, but we have to be careful with what sources we trust. Most of the information that natural is better (despite the fact that many natural substances can kill you too) comes from companies that sell natural cosmetics. These have an agenda too and shouldn’t be trusted anymore than you should trust a study commissioned by a big brand claiming that one of their ingredients is a miracle worker. You should only trust independent studies and independent sources that have no hidden agendas.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Yaya, sure. If you have any questions, just ask away. My email is beautifulwithbrains[at]gmail[com].

  19. Angela says

    Okay well get ready to write these down my dear, I do know what I’m talking about. You can fancy blogs of unsupported with information that is not credible, but suggesting products with little knowledge of the actual reality of your topic is somewhat distasteful.

    Here is a referenced article about what you may have forgotten to study when you earned your cosmetology or esthetics degree,
    and informative for anyone who wishes to know the dangers of chemicals, and the reality of how easily anyone can blog on the Internet and claim to know what they are talking about

    Skin Care Products – How Much Gets In?

    by Karin Parramore, CH

    In our increasingly polluted modern world, it is important to do all we can to avoid increasing the toxin load in our bodies. More and more people are choosing to eat organically grown foods and drink clean water, and many people choose to use all natural skin care products as well. While it is easy to understand why we should choose organically grown foods, just how important is it to avoid synthetic ingredients in body care products? An understanding of the nature of skin, and how ingredients in skin care products might actually penetrate the skin to be delivered into the blood stream, can help us see why, in my opinion, it is imperative we avoid synthetic ingredients at all costs.
    Any discussion of transdermal (“across the skin”) absorption requires at least a rudimentary review of the nature of skin, so here we go–skin 101! The skin is made up of several layers. The basic divisions are the epidermis (the part we usually think of as our skin because it is the part we can touch), the dermis (where most of our blood vessels live), and the subcutaneous tissue. The outermost layer of the epidermis, called the stratum corneum, is made up of cells high in keratin, a substance that helps maintain skin hydration by reducing moisture loss—in effect, keratin contributes to the creation of a semi-waterproof barrier. This hydrophobic (“water-fearing”) layer sits just on top of a hydrophilic (“water-loving”) layer which readily accepts water and water-based substances.
    How is it possible to get water past the stratum corneum, that supposedly waterproof layer? Well, interestingly enough, the more the cells of the stratum corneum are exposed to water, the more permeable they become. The wrinkles we get on our fingers after a long soak in the tub result from water being absorbed into the skin, across the stratum corneum, to the water-loving layer beneath. Recent studies have shown that hydrated skin is 3.3 times more likely to absorb substances across its surface.1 Clearly, our skin is responsible for letting substances in as well as keeping them out, and the active function depends largely on the environment in which the skin finds itself.
    But really, how often do we stop to think about this process? Many of us slather lotion all over our skin to moisturize but rarely do we give a thought to what is happening when we do.
    Lotion is a water and oil emulsion. Because water and oil don’t mix, an emulsifying agent is added to the water and oil components in order to encourage them to get along happily and not separate. Once the product is applied to the skin, however, the innate nature of these two ingredients takes over, and they start to follow their basic natures. The oil component now finds itself in the position to escape, to migrate away from water, and toward other fatty components, namely the sebaceous (oil) glands found in the dermis, and subcutaneous fat found just below the dermis. In a way we can see that the water component of the lotion to some degree helps drive the oil into the skin by repelling the oil.
    Despite how this sounds, the process is not active; substances are passively diffused across the skin and into the bloodstream over time. This means the substance must remain in contact with the skin for quite a while to be absorbed, as passive diffusion is not instantaneous.2 Something like a lotion, which remains in contact with the skin and is often re-applied, is probably one of the better ways to encourage active ingredients to migrate through the skin and into the bloodstream.
    Regardless of the vehicle, however, not all ingredients are capable of crossing this barrier. Here is where the molecular weight of an ingredient comes into play. Without getting too technical, it helps to understand that in order to easily cross the skin a substance must have a molecular weight of less than 500 Daltons (a Dalton is the unit of measure for molecular mass).3 Essential oils, which are not “oils” at all but are actually closer to alcohols in their characteristics, are often added as ingredients in high quality skin care products. All essential oils are characterized by a Dalton weight below 500. This means that all of the wonderful effects associated with essential oils cross quite readily into the bloodstream.
    Fixed oils like almond or olive oil, however, which form the base of most lotions, usually have a higher molecular weight, somewhere around 800 Daltons. This means if fixed oils are absorbed at all the rate is extremely slow. Consequently, these oils will sit on the surface of the skin and act to lubricate it, the reason we use lotions in the first place.
    Of course, many lotions contain ingredients other than fixed oils and essential oils; namely, synthetic fragrances and preservatives. So how does the barrier function of the skin respond to these substances? Are they hydrophobic? What is their molecular weight?
    Well as it turns out, unfortunately, most of these types of substances easily cross the skin and are readily taken up into the bloodstream. The sudden upsurge in estrogen and progesterone patches in recent years is testament to the fact that these types of substances, namely, steroidal (hormonal) substances, quite readily cross into the bloodstream. 4 The only limiting factor seems to be how lipophilic (“fat-loving”) they are.5 In a medium like lotion, where at least 50% of the product is oil, we can safely assume the lotion acts as both a carrier and a delivery system for steroidal compounds.
    But really, is this any surprise? Our entire body communication system is based on hormones, both internally generated and those we receive from outside ourselves, like those from foods. Further, consider the fact that pheromones, those odiferous messengers of our body’s native signaling system, leave our bodies to do their work via the skin. As their name suggests, pheromones are hormones; specifically, steroidal hormones. If our skin were resistant to the passage of hormones, we would never be able to send molecular messages to the outside world. (Despite the modern prudish attitude toward body odor, we are physiologically programmed to tell a potential mate we are interested via scent). It flies in the face of evolutionary theory to block hormonal signaling at the skin.
    In the case of synthetic fragrances, which have been shown to disrupt normal hormonal function6, we have to further consider that a percentage of these molecules volatize into the air and enter the nose, where they are easily absorbed through the olfactory bulb, the part of the brain responsible for our sense of smell. Not only are we receiving them into the bloodstream via topical application, but we are getting a direct dose to the brain via the olfactory. If our entire communication system is based on the signals sent by hormones, what are we doing to ourselves by applying these synthetic steroidal-like compounds?
    This information about the nature of our skin gives us a big clue toward understanding how ingredients in skin care products actually penetrate the skin and enter the blood stream. If we are trying to maintain a toxin-free body, clearly it is a wise decision to choose natural and organic body care products.

    1. http://sciencelinks.jp/j-east/article/200624/000020062406A0940816.php
    2. Physicians’ Desk Reference, 57th ed. Thomson PDR, Montvale, NJ 2003
    3. Gennaro, AR, Ed., Remington’s Practice of Pharmacy, 20th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000 p. 836
    4. http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5453279/description.html
    5. http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=4804926
    6. http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/

    I have listed the many products you can find with preservation through the same formaldehyde derivative.
    And beautybrain, if you’d like you can distinguish which ones may have entered the body by using them. The article above should give you the proper knowledge in which to determine such.

    Aleenes School Glue Arts & Crafts liquid <0.0030
    Elmers Probond Exterior Wood Glue-09/14/2001-Old Product Arts & Crafts gel 0.01
    Knauf Basement Wall Insulation Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf Friendly Feel Duct Wrap, Unfaced and Faced Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf FSK-Faced Residential Insulation Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf Kraft-Faced Residential Insulation Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf Wall Insulation Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Glidden Prime Coat Interior 100 Percent Acrylic Multipurpose Stainkiller Primer Sealer, No. PC1000 Home maintenance liquid <0.1
    Red Devil Speed Demon Acrylic Caulk, White Home maintenance paste
    Red Devil Onetime Lightweight Spackling-02/18/2010 Home maintenance paste
    DAP Alex Fast Dry Acrylic Latex Caulk Plus Silicone Home maintenance paste
    DAP Alex Plus Easy Caulk, White-04/27/2009 Home maintenance paste
    DAP AlexUltra 230 Premium Indoor and Outdoor Sealant, Clear with Microban Antimicrobial Product Prot Home maintenance paste 0-0.1
    DAP Alex Plus Acrylic Latex Caulk Plus Silicone, All Colors Home maintenance paste <0.02
    DAP Dynaflex 230 Premium Indoor and Outdoor Sealant, All Colors-03/13/2009 Home maintenance paste <0.02
    DAP EnergySaver High Performance Air Leak & Gap Sealant-12/18/2009 Home maintenance paste <0.02
    DAP Kwik Seal Plus Easy Caulk High Gloss with Microban, All Colors Home maintenance paste <0.09
    DAP Kwik Seal Plus Premium Kitchen & Bath Adhesive Caulk with Microban Home maintenance paste <0.08
    DAP Kwik Seal Tub & Tile Adhesive Caulk, All Colors-05/23/2008 Home maintenance paste <0.02
    Phenoseal Laminate Repair Filler Home maintenance paste <0.02
    Flood CWF Hardwoods, Clear Wood Finish for Hardwoods, Natural Tone Home maintenance liquid 0.01
    Knauf Duct Liner EM Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf Foil-Faced Residential Insulation Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Knauf Insulation Board Home maintenance board <0.1
    Knauf Sill Sealer Home maintenance fiber <0.1
    Glidden Prime Coat Exteriors Multipurpose Latex Stainkiller Primer Sealer, No. PC3000 Home maintenance liquid <0.01
    Red Devil Quickpaint Caulk Cartridge, White Home maintenance paste
    Red Devil Wallpaper Seam Repair, Clear Home maintenance paste
    Red Devil Onetime Lighten Up Lightweight Spackling Home maintenance paste
    DAP Alex Plus Acrylic Latex Caulk Plus Silicone, Clear Home maintenance paste <0.06
    DAP Alex Plus Easy Caulk, All Colors Home maintenance paste <0.009
    DAP AlexUltra 230 Premium Indoor and Outdoor Sealant, All Colors with Microban Antimicrobial Product Home maintenance paste <0.02
    DAP Dynaflex 230 Premium Indoor and Outdoor Sealant, Clear Home maintenance paste <0.06
    DAP Elastopatch Smooth Flexible Patching Compound, Ready-to-Use Home maintenance paste <0.0001
    DAP Fast N Final Lightweight Spackling, Ready-to-Use-03/17/2009 Home maintenance paste <0.004
    DAP Kwik Seal Plus Easy Caulk High Gloss with Microban, Clear Home maintenance paste 0.1-1
    DAP Kwik Seal Tub & Tile Adhesive Caulk, Clear Home maintenance paste <0.06
    DAP Patch Stick Nail Hole & Crack Filler, Ready-to-Use-01/31/2006 Home maintenance paste <0.004
    DAP FRP Adhesive Home maintenance paste <0.02
    Flood CWF Hardwoods, Clear Wood Finish for Hardwoods, Cedar Tone Home maintenance liquid <0.1
    Elmers Probond Exterior Wood Glue-Old Product Inside the Home gel <0.1
    Dynamo 2X Ultra Concentrated Laundry Detergent, Waterfall Inside the Home liquid
    Ajax 2X Ultra Liquid Detergent with Bleach Alternative Inside the Home liquid
    Murphy Oil Soap Multi-Use Wood Cleaner with Orange Oil, Pump Spray-04/16/2012 Inside the Home pump spray
    Fab 2X Spring Magic Liquid Detergent Inside the Home liquid
    Dynamo 2X Ultra Concentrated Laundry Detergent, Sunrise Fresh Inside the Home liquid
    Quikrete Concrete Repair Landscape/Yard paste <0.1
    Flood CWF-UV Clear Wood Finish, Gold Tone Landscape/Yard liquid <0.1
    Flood CWF UV5 Clear Wood Finish, Cedar Landscape/Yard liquid <0.1
    Quikrete Concrete Bonding Adhesive Landscape/Yard liquid <0.1
    Tetra Pond Barley & Peat Extract Landscape/Yard liquid <2.5
    Flood CWF UV5 Clear Wood Finish, Natural Landscape/Yard liquid <0.1
    Softsoap Body Wash, Pure Cashmere Personal care liquid
    Softsoap Shea Butter Liquid Hand Soap Personal care liquid
    Palmolive Aromatherapy Liquid Hand Soap Personal care liquid
    Irish Spring Body Wash, Icy Blast Personal care liquid
    Global Keratin Hair Taming System with Juvexin, Light Wave Personal care liquid <0.2
    Gerber Baby Wash With Lavender – 15 Fl. Oz. Personal care liquid <0.01
    Softsoap Body Wash, Ultra Rich Shea Butter Personal care liquid
    Softsoap Advanced Moisture Cashmere Liquid Hand Soap Personal care liquid
    Irish Spring Body Wash, Aloe Personal care liquid
    Rejuvenol Chocolate Brazilian Keratin Treatment Personal care liquid 1.0-2.0
    Softsoap Liquid Hand Soap, Coconut & Warm Ginger Personal care liquid
    Hagen Tearless Shampoo for Cats Pet Care liquid
    Zodiac Organique 3 In 1 Beautifying Spray for Dogs Pet Care pump spray 0.1
    Zodiac Organique Foam Shampoo for Cats Pet Care liquid 0.1
    Tetra Aquarium AquaSafe for Goldfish Pet Care liquid <2.5
    Tetra Aquarium Plant FloraPride-08/17/2007 Pet Care liquid <2.5
    Tetra Pond FloraFin Pet Care liquid <2.5
    Tetra Pond Fish Treatment Pet Care liquid 10.0-25.0
    Hagen Flea and Tick Shampoo for Cats Pet Care liquid
    Tetra Plant Flora Pride Iron Intensive Fertilizer Pet Care liquid <0.5
    Zodiac Organique Foam Shampoo for Dogs Pet Care liquid 0.1
    Tetra Aquarium Betta Safe Pet Care liquid <2.5
    Tetra Aquarium Aqua EasyBalance with Nitraban Pet Care liquid <2.5
    Tetra Aquarium Blackwater Extract Pet Care liquid <2.5

    Note: Brand names are trademarks of their respective holders.
    Information is extracted from Consumer Product Information Database ©2001-2013 by DeLima Associates.
    All rights reserved.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Angela, there is no reason to get snarky. I do believe that a lot of people publish, in good faith, inaccurate information simply because they don’t have the necessary background to properly understand scientific studies, which are written in a difficult language.

      The article you posted is a good example of this. First of all, one of its sources is the cosmetic dabatase, run by the environmental working group, an organization famous for getting facts wrong. In fact, whenever they publish one of their scary reports, the scientific community promptly dismisses it as inaccurate if not false.

      The article makes some inaccurate statements as well. “The wrinkles we get on our fingers after a long soak in the tub result from water being absorbed into the skin, across the stratum corneum, to the water-loving layer beneath.” This happens because staying too long in the water washes away sebum, which is what makes skin waterproof. Once its protective barrier is disrupted of course things get in! But as long as this barrier is intact, ingredients remain on top of the skin and cause no harm.

      The first study, used to prove that hydrated skin absorbs substances more readily, is also presented in an inaccurate way. First of all, the study was conducted in vitro and we don’t know yet if its results apply in vivo. Even if they did, it’d only prove that steroids can better penetrate hydrated skin. It doesn’t prove that other substances can as well. You cannot use a study done in vitro claiming that steroids can penetrate skin to suggest that all substances do so in vivo too. It just doesn’t work like that.

      But even if they did penetrate the skin, they’d only do so very slowly, which would give plenty of time to our kidneys to get rid of them, so they still wouldn’t hurt us.

      I also don’t agree that organic and natural cosmetics are better. A lot of natural ingredients contain toxins too. Water contains lead, apples cyanide… The list is endless. And a lot of natural stuff can be irritating too. On the other hand, a lot of synthetic stuff is perfectly safe. Simply put, some ingredients are bad and others good, regardless of their origin.

      To better understand skin penetration and absorption, I’d recommend you read this article: http://personalcaretruth.com/2011/01/the-impermeable-facts-of-skin-penetration-and-absorption/

  20. Angela says

    Understand everyone is born with cancer cells already in our body, what we don’t realize is certain things activate or trigger the activation of these cells. Such conditions can happen when exposed to things like cancer causing agents, radiation, etc… Multiple cancer causing agents are found in cigarettes, which is another reason they are so dangerous. Here is a more familiar list of the toxin your pinpointing,
    There is also a list of other names they use for it.

    Chemical Information
    Chemical Name: Diazolidinylurea
    CAS Registry Number: 078491-02-8
    Synonyms: Diazolidinyl urea; N-(1,3-Bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl)-; Diazolidinylurea; 1-(1,3-Bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxoimidazolidin-4-yl)-1,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)urea; N,N’-Bis(hydroxymethyl) urea; Urea, N-(1,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl-N,N’-bis(hyd- roxymethyl)-

    Products that contain this ingredient
    Brand Category Form Percent
    Dep Extra Super Control Water Based Gel Personal care gel
    Aussie Instant Daily Conditioner-Old Product Personal care liquid
    Imina Oil Sheen Spray-Old Product Personal care pump spray
    Cover Girl Invisible Concealer-Ethnic Shades-Old Product Personal care liquid
    pHisoderm Antibacterial Skin Cleanser Personal care pump spray
    Vitabath Bath & Shower Gelee, Moisturizing Bath Gel, Plus for Dry Skin Personal care gel
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Cat’s Eye-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Crystal Mint-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Earthy Shimmer-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Glistening Gold-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Shimmering Pebble-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Silver Lilac-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Sleek Sage-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Liquid Pencil Felt Tip Eyeliner-11/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Cream Soda-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Dark Denim-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Ginger Frost-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Moody Blue-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Silver Lilac-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Sleek Sage-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    John Frieda Brilliant Brunette Finishing Creme, Satin Shine Personal care cream
    John Frieda Brilliant Brunette Light Reflecting Daily Conditioner with Light Enhancers, Chestnut to Personal care liquid
    John Frieda Brilliant Brunette Light Reflecting Moisturizing Conditioner with Light Enhancers, Chest Personal care liquid
    Barbasol Beard Buster, Thick and Rich Shaving Cream, Soothing Aloe Personal care aerosol
    Dial Hand Sanitizer, Pump Dispenser, Light Citrus Scent Personal care liquid
    Joico K-Pak Style Smoothing Hair Balm Personal care cream
    Rejuvenol Brazilian Color Care Deep Treatment Revitalizing Masque Personal care liquid <0.1
    Rejuvenol Keratin After Treatment Conditioner Personal care liquid <0.1
    Global Keratin Hair Taming System with Juvenix, Moisturizing Conditioner Personal care liquid
    Soft & Beautiful Just for Me! 2-in-1 Conditioning Detangler Spray Personal care liquid
    Suave Men Styling Gel, Wet Look Personal care gel
    Soft & Beautiful Just for Me Naturally Gentle Texture Softener Personal care kit (Shampoo)
    Herbal Essence Body Wash (Dry Skin and Normal)-Old Product Personal care lotion
    Revlon Vitamin C Absolutes Refreshing Tonic Personal care liquid
    Revlon Everylash Mascara, Black Personal care liquid
    Revlon Lashfull Mascara, Black Brown Personal care liquid
    Neutrogena Fragrance Free Light Night Cream Personal care paste
    Neutrogena Healthy Skin Face Lotion-SPF 15 Personal care liquid
    LA Looks Extra Super Hold Personal care gel
    Cover Girl Liquid Pencil-Old Product Personal care felt tip pencil
    Cover Girl Smoothers Gel Eyecolor-Old Product Personal care soft stick
    Paul Mitchell The Rinse, Instant Moisture Balancing Conditioner Personal care liquid
    Vitabath Bath & Shower Gelee Moisturizing Bath Gel, Original Spring Green Personal care gel
    Vitabath Bath & Shower Gelee Moisturizing Bath/Shower Gel, Plus Dry Skin Personal care gel
    Ankh Mascara, Black Personal care liquid
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Cream Soda-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Dark Denim-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Ginger Frost-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Moody Blue-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Shimmering Sky-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Silver Streak-Old Product Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Cat's Eye-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Crystal Mint-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Earthy Shimmer-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Glistening Gold-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Shimmering Pebble-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Cover Girl Eyeslicks Gel Eyecolor, Silver Streak-10/01/2007 Personal care pencil
    Aveeno Creamy Moisturizing Oil Personal care liquid
    John Frieda Brilliant Brunette Light Reflecting Conditioner with Light Enhancers, Amber to Maple Personal care liquid
    John Frieda Brilliant Brunette Light Reflecting Moisturizing Conditioner with Light Enhancers, Amber Personal care liquid
    John Frieda Luxurious Volume Full Splendor Conditioner Personal care liquid
    Neutrogena Body Lotion-Sesame Formula Personal care paste
    Ponds Deep Cleanser and Make-Up Remover, Cucumber-06/21/2007 Personal care cream
    Joico Daily Care Leave-In Detangler, For All Hair Types, Quadramine Complex Personal care liquid
    Joico Silk Results Straight Smoother Blow-Dry Creme Personal care cream
    Rejuvenol Keratin After Treatment Shampoo Personal care liquid <0.1
    Rejuvenol Pure Collagen Maintenance Conditioner Personal care liquid 0.1-1
    TIGI Bed Head Control Freak Extra Extra Straight Hair Straightener Level 4 Personal care aerosol
    Suave Men Styling Gel, Firm Hold Personal care gel
    TRESemme Anti-Frizz Secret Smoothing Creme Personal care liquid
    Soft & Beautiful Just for Me Naturally Gentle Texture Softener Personal care kit (Moisturizing Lotion)
    Herbal Essence Fruit Fusions Moisturizing Body Wash-Old Product Personal care liquid
    Revlon Everylash Mascara, Brown Personal care liquid
    Revlon Moon Drops Softening Toner, Alcohol-Free, For Normal To Dry Skin Personal care liquid
    Neutrogena Rainbath Moisturizing Body Mist Personal care pump spray
    Neutrogena Moisture for Sensitive Skin-Facial Personal care pump spray
    Dep Root Boost Volumizer for Maximum Lift Personal care gel
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Select Moisturizing Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Select Extra Body Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    Four Paws Bunny Bath Shampoo & Deodorizer Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Medicated Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Detangling & Freshening Spray Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Baby Powder Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Coconut Pineapple Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Grape Cranberry Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Sea Breeze Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Tropical Pet Care liquid
    Khargosh Rabbit and Small Animal Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Select Deep Cleansing Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 FerretSheen Deodorizing & Conditioning Spray Pet Care pump spray
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Tender Care Puppy Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Natural Oatmeal Shampoo Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Perfect Coat Ultra Moisturizing Shampoo, Dogs Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Berry Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Crisp Apple Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Lavender Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Tangerine Melon Pet Care liquid
    8 in 1 Pro Pet Salon Freshening Sprays, Vanilla Peach Pet Care liquid

    • Angela says

      There are other products out there in the market, but if they are not a “name brand” they are not going to be listed here. It’s up to us to know what to look for when buying products, if you can avoid anything with

      Chemical Name: Diazolidinylurea
      CAS Registry Number: 078491-02-8
      Synonyms: Diazolidinyl urea; N-(1,3-Bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl)-; Diazolidinylurea; 1-(1,3-Bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxoimidazolidin-4-yl)-1,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)urea; N,N’-Bis(hydroxymethyl) urea; Urea, N-(1,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl-N,N’-bis(hyd- roxymethyl)-

      What’s sad is people are willing to buy stuff in smaller bottles, thus using the contents before they expire. We would prefer using a product that may expire, than using something that will cause us to expire. How many times have you gone in your kitchen and made a face mask? A hair conditioner? These home remedies are the same ones I’ve been using since I was a child watching my mother. I’m thirty years old and don’t look any different than my senior year in high school. God gave us a brain, it’s up to us to use it, if anyone would like to know the most awesome face mask that will actually improve “cysts” which are painful acne, it hardens low below the skins surface, and is impossible to pop. This type of acne takes much longer to heal but if you use one simple home made facial mask, which you can leave on all night, as a matter of fact, you can let it dry and no one will probably notice its there. You take one egg, crack in half and separate the egg white and yolk in separate bowls. Whip the egg white until it bubbles and with a clean cotton ball, saturate with the egg white and dab it all over your face. It will tighten your pores as it dries, you may even experience an instant noticeable difference, I know I have before. The redness and splotches will clear and tone will be restored. It’s a great simple trick that’s been used for centuries, do yourself a favor and try it. I used to keep the remainder in my fridge, the cold egg white honestly feels more effective than any product I ever used. And once its dry you can leave it on or rinse off with water and go about your regime. I have left the house before, and forgot to wash it off, no one even noticed, lol. I don’t know if many people know this but the product Retin-A has baby foreskin in it. Now that’s just disgusting, so if your willing to try that, just do yourself a favor and grab an egg. Btw you can throw the yolk in your hair, conditioning properties are always a great way to fight dry hair.

      • beautifulwithbrains says

        Angela, why would anyone want to spend money on something that expires before you can finish it? It’s just a waste. Especially, when there is no proof that preservatives cause cancer (or any other disease) in the small concentrations used in cosmetics. Using a product without preservatives is much more dangerous because bacteria and fungi may grow in it and give you an infection. That, unlike cancer, is a serious risk.

        I don’t have anything against natural remedies and think some of them work quite well. I will definitely try the mask you mentioned. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Angela, I agree that some things can trigger cancer and should be avoided. However, while cigarettes have been proved to cause cancer, cosmetics haven’t. If they are so dangerous, then why aren’t people dying left, right and center?

      I repeat again. It is the dose that makes the poison. When toxins are present in our bodies in small amounts, our kidneys easily get rid of them. It’s when they are present in big amounts that start to accumulate because our bodies can’t keep up with them anymore that they harm us.

    • beautifulwithbrains says

      Ceirra, as long as it is kept within the minuscule amounts set by law, there’s no reason to worry about it.

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